de Havilland Aircraft Company DH106 Comet in BOAC livery

Manufacturers

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Boeing Aeroplane Company

Boeing Aeroplane Company

The Boeing Aeroplane Company was founded by William E Boeing on 15 July 1916. The company was originally called the Pacific Aero Products Company. The company's first aircraft, produced in June 1916, was the single-engine biplane seaplane aircraft, the Boeing Model 1. In February 1933 Boeing introduced the Boeing Model 247, an all-metal, propeller-driven aeroplane. In 1938 Boeing introduced the Boeing 314 Clipper flying boat, which were used by Pan American World Airways and British Overseas Airways Corporation. During the Second World War production concentrated on military aircraft, including the B17 and B29. Boeing's first post-war civilian aircraft was the Boeing 377 Stratocruiser, introduced in 1947. Taking advantage of its experience building military jets in the 1940s and 1950s Boeing developed the Boeing 707 jet airliner and the KC-135 military derivative. Subsequent jet airliners included the 737 and the jumbo jet, the 747, introduced... View profile for Boeing Aeroplane Company

Bristol Aeroplane Company

Bristol Aeroplane Company

The Bristol Aeroplane Company was founded in 1910 by Sir George White as the British and Colonial Aircraft Company. Based at Filton in Bristol the company produced its first aircraft, the Bristol Boxkite, in 1910. During the Great War the company produced a number of different military fighters, including the Bristol Scout. By 1920 the company had adopted the 'Bristol' name and by 1928 was producing the Bristol Bulldog military biplane. Further military aircraft, including the Bristol Beaufighter, were produced during the Second World War. The Bristol Type 167 Brabazon was introduced in 1949, however it was a commercial failure and only one complete aircraft was built. Bristol had greater success with the Britannia and 85 aircraft were built between 1952 and 1960. The company had also diversified to include missile and car manufacturing. In 1959 a Government enforced merger saw Bristol merge with... View profile for Bristol Aeroplane Company

British Aircraft Corporation

British Aircraft Corporation

In 1959 a Government enforced merger saw the aviation interests of the Bristol Aeroplane Company, English Electric, Hunting Aircraft and Vickers-Armstrongs merge to form the British Aircraft Corporation (BAC). The company continued to manufacture existing aircraft - such as the Vickers VC10 - under their original manufacturer's name. The first BAC aircraft was the BAC 1-11 aircraft. In total 224 aircraft were built between 1963 to 1982. BAC also produced military aircraft including the BAC TSR-2 aircraft, infamously cancelled in 1964. In November 1962 the British and French governments signed an agreement to jointly design, develop, and manufacturer the world's first supersonic airliner. The project would see BAC and Sud Aviation produce Concorde, an aircraft that remained in service between 1976 and 2003. On 29 April 1977 another Government enforced merger saw the merger of BAC, Hawker Siddeley Aviation, Hawker Siddeley Dynamics and Scottish... View profile for British Aircraft Corporation

de Havilland Aircraft Company

de Havilland Aircraft Company

The de Havilland Aircraft Company was founded in 1920 by Geoffrey de Havilland. Prior to establishing the company de Havilland worked as chief designer for the Aircraft Manufacturing Company (Airco). Initially the company produced biplane aircraft, such as the de Havilland Gipsy Moth. Subsequent aircraft included the de Havilland Dragon Rapide passenger aircraft. During the Second World War de Havilland built the famous Mosquito fighter-bomber aircraft. 7,781 Mosquito aircraft were built between 1940 and 1950. de Havilland introduced the DH106 Comet aircraft in 1949. The Comet was the first production commercial jet airliner, but its service was overshadowed by a tragic series of accidents. Military aircraft production included the DH 108 Swallow and DH 110, but development of both aircraft was beset by fatal accidents. Hawker Siddeley Aviation acquired de Havilland in 1960 but operated it as a separate company until 1963. Aircraft... View profile for de Havilland Aircraft Company

Hawker Siddeley Aviation

Hawker Siddeley Aviation

Hawker Siddeley Aviation was formed in 1935 when Hawker Aircraft acquired engine manufacturer Armstrong Siddeley and aircraft manufacturer Armstrong Whitworth Aircraft, along with A V Roe & Company (Avro) and Gloster Aircraft Company. Each company produced their own designs: Avro produced the famous four-engined Lancaster bomber; Hawker Siddeley produced the Hawker Hurricane, made famous during the Battle of Britain; and Gloster went on to produce the Gloser Meteor, the only jet to be used by the Allies during the Second World War. In 1948, the company reformed its aviation interests as Hawker Siddeley Aviation and its missile and space technology interests as Hawker Siddeley Dynamics. Hawker's engine interests were merged with those of Bristol, forming Bristol Siddeley (later purchased by Rolls-Royce). On 29 April 1977 a Government enforced merger saw the British Aircraft Corporation, Hawker Siddeley Aviation, Hawker Siddeley Dynamics and Scottish Aviation merged to form British Aerospace... View profile for Hawker Siddeley Aviation

Vickers-Armstrongs (Aircraft) Ltd

Vickers-Armstrongs (Aircraft) Ltd

Vickers-Armstrongs (Aircraft) Ltd was formed in 1927 by the merger of Vickers Limited and the Sir W G Armstrong Whitworth & Company. During the Great War Vickers had produced a number of military aircraft, including the Vickers Vimy heavy-bomber. Following the merger Vickers-Armstrongs interests were expanded to include shipbuilding and armaments. In 1928 Vickers acquired the Supermarine Aviation Works. Supermarine later went on to produce the legendary Second World War fighter aircraft, the Supermarine Spitfire. After the Second World War Vickers-Armstrongs produced the Vickers Viking, Viscount and Vanguard airliners. In 1959 Vickers introduced the VC10 jet airliner followed by an extended version, the Super VC10. The type remains in service with the Royal Air Force in a refuelling role. In 1959 a Government enforced merger saw Vickers-Armstrongs merge with the Bristol Aeroplane Company, English Electric and Hunting Aircraft to form the British Aircraft Corporation... View profile for Vickers-Armstrongs (Aircraft) Ltd